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Smart CoffeeMachine Module

1 year ago 1018
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Description

ESP8266 module with Tasmota firmware and interfaces to Delonghi Magnifica Coffee Machine that convert it to Smart Coffee Maker that could be connected to a Smart Home ecosystem.

Documents

Schematic

BOM

ID Name Designator Footprint Quantity
1 1000uF 16V C3 CAP-D6.3XH5.5 1
2 1uF C4 C0805 1
3 100nF C6 C0805 1
4 100uF C7 CAP-D6.3XF2.5 1
5 100uF 10V C8 CAP-D6.3XH5.5 1
6 KLL4148 D1,D2 LL-34_L3.5-W1.5-RD 2
7 Header-Male-2.54_1x6 H1 HDR-TH_6P-P2.54-V 1
8 Header-Male-2.54_1x2 H2 2X1/2.54_EDITED 1
9 Header-Male-2.54_1x3 H3,H4,H5 HDR-TH_3P-P2.54-V 3
10 REG1117 IC2 SOT223 1
11 J-Header-Male-2.54_1x2 J1 HDR-2X1/2.54 1
12 Blue LED1 LED3MM 1
13 Blue LED2 LED 0805 1
14 RED LED3 LED3MM 1
15 GREEN LED4 LED3MM 1
16 Header-Male-2.54_1x4 P1 HDR-4X1/2.54 1
17 Header-Female-2.54_1x2 P2 JST-XH-2PIN 1
18 BC847C Q1 SOT-23-3_L2.9-W1.6-P1.90-LS2.8-BR 1
19 2N5401G Q2 TO92-INLINE 1
20 2N7002 Q3 SOT-23-3_L2.9-W1.3-P1.90-LS2.4-BR 1
21 10k R1,R2,R3,R4,R15 R0805 5
22 470 R5,R6,R13,R14 R0805 4
23 5.1k R7 R0805 1
24 1k R8,R9,R10,R11,R12,R16,R17,R18,R19 R0805 9
25 100k R20 R0805 1
26 Push Button 6x6 SW-1 PUSH BUTTON 6X6 1
27 ESP-12F(ESP8266MOD) U1 ESP-12F 1
28 MIC5205 U1-RT9013_500MA SOT23-5 1
29 HT7333-A U2 SOT-89 1
30 PC817X2NSZ9F(B) U3,U4 DIP-4 2
31 SN74LVC1G14DBVR_C434069 U5 SOT-23-5_L3.0-W1.7-P0.95-LS2.8-BL 1
32 Optopair with Air Gap U7 DIP-4 1

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Comments (1)

ShaggyDog18 Reply

Hacked Coffee Machine, made it “smart” part of SmartHome
Ecosystem


I possess a good old Delonghi Coffee Machine (DCM) (not a promotion :-) and want it to be
“smart”. So, I hacked it by installing ESP8266 module with interface to its brain/microcontroller
using Tasmota firmware.
DCM is based on PIC microcontroller (uC); so, to make it run
by ESP8266 with Tasmota on-board I built an interface to PIC uC in a way that
does not to interfere its normal operations. Sure, all existing DCM functionality
should be preserved. The easiest way is to emulate buttons. I use opto-couplers
to be sure ESP module does not disrupt DCM electronics and uC operations.


Hardware
1.      Soldered a “smart” module based on ESP-12F ESP8266
module (see pictures). You may also use a standard sonoff module hacking it
according to my schematic. I use GPIO16, 14, and 12; they are usually vacant in
sonoff modules and you would need just solder wires to a corresponding ESP8266
pins. However, my goal was to avoid using relays. So, I relay on
optocoupler-based interface.


2.      To manage DCM, ESP module interfaces to two main
buttons: “Power On/Off” and “Make a Cup of Coffee”. I soldered pair of wires to
each buttons’ contacts right on the control board (see pictures, 2xGray wires
to each button). The board is covered by a hot glue to protect it from moisture,
so I melt it by soldering iron set at temp of ~120*C, then soldered wires and
glued contacts and wires back.


3.      I also soldered a wire to GND (Green wire on
pictures), one of large polygons on the control board. Found/checked it by
multimeter.


4.      Opto-couples (see schematic) are connected in
parallel to buttons with a 1k current limiting resistor. A button is usually
pulled up to a positive bus by pull-up resistor. To connect opto-coupler in a right way, you have to find a “positive
end” of the button; that can be done by multi-meter by measuring voltage on each
wire and GND. A collector of opto-pair to be connected to positive wire through
1k resistor. Emitter – to the second wire (which is usually connected to GND).


5.      Red wire at pictures is connected to +5V bus
(for other purpose, not used for ESP module, not subject of this post).


6.      To power ESP8266 I use a dedicated 5V 1A power
supply. An existing DCM power supply would not be enough to run ESP module that
can consume up to 800mA in pics. So, it is much better/stable/safer to set up a
dedicated 5V power supply. You may use an old 1A phone charger, connected to
mains wires right inside DCM.


Firmware/Configuration
Tasmota with the following configuration:
1.      Set up two “relays”, input for DCM
“Ready-to-brew-coffee” signal and configure ESP8266 build-in LED as following:
GPIO2   LED1i
GPIO16 Relay 1   - to emulate a “Power ON/Off” button
GPIO14 Relay 2   - to emulate a “Make a Cup of Coffee” button
GPIO12 Counter1   -  input to read DCM READY signal (not used yet,
out of scope)


2.      To emulate a short press of a button I use BLINK
feature of Tasmota; configured Blink by following commands in Tasmota Console:
Blinktime 3     - means
a blink duration of 0.3 sec – to mimic
a short push on a button Blinkcount 1   - just
a single push on a button is required
Sleep 250        - to save energy


3.      To “press” buttons I use the following commands
(as shortcuts in my smart phone):
http://\/cm?cmnd=Power1%20blink – for
“Power ON/Off” button
http://\/cm?cmnd=Power2%20blink – for
“Brew a cup of coffee” button


Works like a charm! Next steps would be:


  • Use READY signal (would need your help, I am newbie
    in Smart Home)

  • Connect Smart DCM to Smart Home.

The way I did it could be used with other old but still
reliable machines and apparatus, limited by your imagination only😊



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