TP4056 LiPo Charger Protector Booster SMD

1 year ago 756
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Description

LiPo battery charging, protection and 5V booster.

IMG_20190512_153746.jpgCE8301_efficiency_x.pngME2108_efficiency_x.pngQX2303_efficiency_x.png

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This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)

Documents

LiPo Charger Protector Booster

LiPo_PowerBoard_v1.3

BOM

ID Name Designator Footprint Quantity
1 Connector VIN,VOUT,BAT HDR-1X2/2.54 3
2 SS14 D1 SMA(DO-214AC) 1
3 100n C1,C2 0805 2
4 10u C3 0805 1
5 POWER OUT USB2 USB-2.0-A-F-90-JCJ-H9.36 1
6 47uH L1 IND-706628_IND_0630_VAN 1
7 POWER IN USB1 USB PWR CONNECTOR 1
8 Slide Switch PWR SLIDE SWITCH DPDT 1P2T JB 1
9 ME2108A50PG U3 SOT-89(SOT-89-3) 1
10 FS8205 Q1 SOT-23-6 1
11 1k R4 0805 1
12 1k2 R3 0805 1
13 1k5 R2,R1 0805 2
14 100R R5 0805 1
15 DW01A or FS312F-G U2 SOT-23-6 1
16 47u C6,C5,C4 1206 3
17 CHRG LED2 LED-0805 1
18 FULL LED1 LED-0805 1
19 TP4056 U1 SOP-8_EP_150MIL 1

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Comments (34)

shauwki Reply

Is there a way to crank up the output current? Say, like 2A or 3A?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@shauwki Sorry, this design is only for small projects. For more power you need a different boost converter IC like the MT3608 and an inductor with higher current rating. Unfortunately you'll need a slightly different board design for it.

thyg Reply

@shauwki Hi! Were you able to figure out something for 2A-3A output?  Would be so cool to upgrade a few components to get 2-3A . But I'm not experienced enough to figure out how to substitute IC's or do mosfet SMT heat dissipation.

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, I can't see any possibility to get 3A with this board design as all the DC/DC converter ICs I know have a different footprint and a different support circuitry. I will probably design a board with 3A if there is a demand for such a thing but it will take some time (finding a proper IC, trying to understand the chinese datasheet, designing the circuit, designing the board, waiting for everything to arrive from China, testing, maybe doing it all again if it doesn't work.... I guess 2 - 3 month).

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Hi!  I saw your other project with the IP5306, does it work ok at 2A+ VOUT?  If so I was thinking that would be a good starting point, it doesn't have protection for Li=Ion but it has everything else.  PS Thank you for these and all your open source designs.

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, you can only reach the max output current with a fully charged battery. It falls below 2A if the battery is somewhere in the midlle, so it might not be the solution you are looking for. If you want to try the IP5306 board be aware that the GND-connection of the IC is underneath (EP-plate) so you have to work with some reflow method. I think I will make a small change to the board underside to expose the copper in order to make this an easier task. I don't know if the IC has some battery protection as its datasheet is unfortunatly in chinese ;-(

thyg Reply

@wagiminator OK Thank you again!  When you power your portable projects are you typically using LiPo or Li-ion?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, I use both (ok, LiPo is just a special type of Li-Ion). Dimension and capacity are the main factors for choosing the right battery. I also often use LiFePO4 batteries, but they need a different charging and protection method. By the way, I found a promising DC/DC converter IC with up to 4.5A. Now I need to find a way to increase the current of the overcurrent protection which is fixed at 3A. I need 5 or 6A from the battery in order to have 3A at 5V. I have an idea but I have to test my theory...

thyg Reply

@wagiminator That would be incredible if we have 3A at 5V.  Can I help in anyway?  I can help with the cost of ordering test PCBs.  My one other ideal is to use JLCPCB SMT service where possible, just curious but is your new IC in the SMT parts database?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg FP6298XR-G1 (part no C88319)

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Thats great news it is compatible with SMT service.  I am happy to help with the cost of some test PCBs once you are ready especially so you can get the fastest shipping and test them sooner.  I can venmo/paypal etc. Or if you have a patreon I'd love to support the work you're doing.

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Thanx for your offer, but this is not necessary. PCB and components are already ordered (but with the cheapest shipping costs, so it will take about 2 weeks).

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Wow good news, thank you. Best of luck that the test works and I'll check in in 2 weeks!

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, everything arrived and I've already tested it ... and I made a stupid mistake. The converter ic has a maximum SWITCHING current of 4.5A, which is not the maximum OUTPUT current - of course (sometimes I'm such an idiot ;-) So I was only able to get around 2A of output current. So let's see it as an intermediate step to the 3A-peak of the mountain. Nevertheless I will post this design and I will try it again with a new ic: FP6277XR-G1 (part no. C88312). Of course this will take some time again.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Hi, thank you for the update!! I think this is actually good news, can it sustain 2A at 5V indefinitely?


I say good news because it seems fine to have these modules at different amperages.. 1A, 2A, and next 3A.  That way we can pick the correct choice for specific projects.


If it can sustain 2A I will probably submit to JLCPCB for SMT fabrication this weekend.. are there any changes you would like to see me make to original design (say, for testing) before I submit?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg I only tested it with full batteries but I highly doubt it will reach the 2A on almost empty batteries. With a falling voltage the battery has to provide more current to keep the power stable, but the current is limited by the converter ic. I will redesign the board with the new ic this week I hope (as always: different ic = different pinout and different support circuitry). If you want you can take the new design and test it by yourself.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Ahh yes I didnt think of that... ok I might just wait to see if the new IC works, I'll think about it this week.  Thank you so much for all the work you're doing on this.  Seems like something everyone would want, it would be useful in so many projects and I really cant find anything else available.

thyg Reply

@thyg Hi this might be a novice question but will the protection IC be affected by so much current going through the boost converter?  Like if 7A is going through the FP6277 (converted to 2-3A output), does the DW01A/FS8205 need to handle that much current too?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, I'm glad you asked. The current only flows through the FS8205 dual MOSFET. The DW01A only monitors the current. It does this by comparing the voltage drop across the MOSFET with its internal 150mV reference. As the RDS(on) of the FS8205 is around 2x25mOhm, the DW01A closes the MOSFET at 150mV/50mOhm = 3A (overcurrent protection). The FS8205 itself can handle a continous current of up to 5A, but it gets quite hot then. I solved both problems by using two FS8205 in parallel. First, the voltage drop is cut in half, so the DW01A shuts down at 150mV/25mOhm = 6A. Second, one FS8205 must only handle half of the current (3A) which is well within its specs. I have already tested this in the 2A-version of the board and it works so far. In theory the output current of the boost converter should be (3.7V (battery) - 0.15V (voltage drop across the MOSFET)) 6A (max current) 0.9 (boost converter efficiency) / 5V (output of the boost converter) = 3.8A on an ideal battery (with no internal resistance). If you use a good battery with a low internal resistance (typically the 18650 which are used in e-cigarettes) and the efficiency of the boost converter is not much lower than 90%, the 3A could be achieved .... in theory. We will see in about two weeks what reality has to say about it.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Brilliant thanks for the explanation, this is really exciting if it works I dont think there's anyone else offering this module at 3A/5V from a single 18650.   Did you have to upgrade the inductor too?   PS Yes I plan on using Samsung 25Rs they are rated for 20A or so.  And the 3A out is perfect because it will power a string of 144/m LEDs.  But speaking of vape mods, some can be even be set to 100W+ per battery, so while we are waiting can I ask about this from the top-down?  Suppose I want 20A from a single Samsung 25R converted to about 7-8A at 5V.   It sounds like the protection is just adding more/beefier mosfets,  but to boost to 5V there is no chip right, what would someone need to do then?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg I can use the same coil as it has a saturation current of 7A. Keep in mind that 18650 batteries usually have not more than 3000mAh capacity, if you draw 3A from the boost converter you'll draw around 6A from the battery which means after half an hour the battery will be empty. That's why you normally built such high current power banks with two or more batteries. 3A or more are then easier to be achieved because you can use a buck instead of a boost converter. As far as vape mods go I'm really not sure, I guess they use specially designed ICs which are capable of providing much current for a short time (maybe 10 seconds) and then they have to cool down. I don't know if they use real buck converters or just chop the current. Anyway, bigger MOSFETs can easily handle such high currents. But this will be a topic for a further investigation...

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Thank you for all this info. I have another project in mind, I have a dark closet, i want to attach hall effect sensor (through transistor i guess) to a single 12V 2W LED, I'll put a magnet on the closet door and when the door opens the LED turns on.  Powered by single 18650 boosted to 12V.  That LED draws 0.14A at 12V.. so should be less than an amp from the battery total.  But it looks like the 6277 only goes up to 5.3V output... is that right & if so any thoughts on what I might do for 12V, or does one of your other designs have a 12V option?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg No, I only have a solar charger which uses the MT3608 that can deliver up to 28V. This will also work but might be an overkill if you do not plan to connect a small solar panel to it ;-)

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Solar would be perfect for a 3rd project I want to do, just a simple device that tells me if there's mail in my mailbox. Is this a public project I searched through yours and don't think I found it.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator I'm starting to think 2 batteries in Series with a Step-down converter would make a lot of sense.. I've never tried using 2S or 2P before, I know there are BMS boards available but is there a simpler way?  Suppose I want a 2S1P battery, can this be accomplised with 2x 4056's to charge each battery, 2x DW01As to protect each battery, and then somehow send the combined current at 7.4V to a buck converter?  Or does it need to get more complicated than that once you go into 2S territory?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg I think it doesn't work when they are in series as there would be a short due to the common ground but I never thought about it in depth. In order to protect the batteries there must be some kind of a balanced charger. That's something for another project, but I'm not sure if it makes any sense as there are a lot of different powerbanks commercially available.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator ok so whenever you need 7.4V+ are you typically going with the premade lipo packs instead of two li-ion cells?  Is there a good system you can recommend for leaving the battery inside the project and just offering a port to charge the battery, the same way I would use the USB port as a charge port in this project we are working on?

Hafiz_Fs Reply

Hey, I'm new in electronic, my question is what function of U2?

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg Hi, actually I've never made such projects yet. Typically I'm using 5V for my projects. Sometimes I need 12V but only with a small current, so I simply integrate a boost converter into the circuit. But I think there are a lot of balanced charger boards out there which can do the job.

Stefan Wagner Reply

@Hafiz_Fs Hi and welcome to electronics. Li-Ion or LiPo batteries are very versatile, but they must be handled with care in order to not decrease their lifespan or even make them explode in the worst case. Overcharging, overdischarging, short circuit or reverse polarity can cause bad things to the battery. U2 is a so-called "battery protection ic" which takes care if that. It does it by constantly measuring the voltage across the battery and the current flowing in (when charging) or coming out (when discharging). If something goes wrong it takes the battery out of the circuit by closing the MOSFET (Q1) which acts like a switch between the negative side of the battery (B-) and ground (in this case OUT-) of the circuit. Many LiPo batteries already have such a protection circuit built in, but especially the often used 18650 batteries usually not. I hope this answer helps.

Stefan Wagner Reply

@thyg HEUREKA, as a famous greek would say. Steady 3A with a peak of 3.9A for about 10 seconds until it overheats. I will make some more tests and add room for a heatsink on the board as it gets really hot at 3A and above and then I will post the design.

thyg Reply

@wagiminator Congrats!!!! Great news & I can't wait to see how you solve the heat dissipation.

ANJALI MOTGHARE Reply

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